Saxon Sceats


Saxon sceats are very interesting coins and Spinks goes some way to identifying them. Other books like Jeffery J North -English Hammered Coinage, Volume 1, Early Anglo Saxon to Henry III can also be a great asset and has greater detail for the various types, including plates of images for quick reference as well as detailed descriptions. However, the book is somewhat dated as and further types have been discovered since it was published in 1994.


Sceats fall into 2 main categories,


Primary & Intermediate c. 680 - 710 AD


and Secondary C 710 - 750 AD


The primary series is listed types A - F, and the secondary series is listed types G – Z.


All of the listed types have sub-series attached to them. The following examples of the types should be taken a guide and starting point for further internet research.


More recent books can be excellent also, Sceattas - An Illustrated Guide: Anglo-Saxon Coins and Icons by Tony Abramson 2006 comes very highly recommended.


Sceats fall into 2 main categories,


Primary & Intermediate c. 680 - 710 AD


and Secondary C 710 - 750 AD


The primary series is listed types A - F, and the secondary series is listed types G - Z, all of the listed types have sub series attached to them, the following examples can only be seen as examples of the types, but should aid as a guide and starting point for further internet research and controlled google searchs, as described in the Celtic section 



PRIMARY AND INTERMEDIATE

SERIES A

Radiate bust/standard type

SERIES B

Bird on Cross type

SERIES C

Runic Types

SERIES D

Continental Runic Types

SERIES E

Porcupine Types

SERIES F

Cross on Steps

SERIES E

Plumed Bird Types

SERIES E

Porcupine Types

SECONDARY SCEATS

SERIES G

Diademed head / standard

SERIES H

Hamwic Series

SERIES J

Late Bird on Cross Types

SERIES K

Wolf Types

SERIES M

Hound & Spiral Branch Types

SERIES O

Various Types

SERIES L

London Types

SERIES N

Two Standing Figures Types

SERIES Q

Bird and Beast Types

SERIES R

Crude & Stylised Runic Types

SERIES S

Female Centaur Types

SERIES T

Diademed Bust with Inscription / Porcupine Types

SERIES V

She Wolf & Twins / Bird on Branch

SERIES X

Woden Monster

SERIES U

Standing Figure / Bird on Branch

SERIES W

Half Figure with Crosses/cross

SERIES Y

Early Regal coinage of Northumbria

SERIES Z

Facing Beast / Bust Types

INTERNET SEARCHES FOR SCEATS


Some useful searches for you in relation to Sceats, click the links, searches will open in a new window


1/. The Portable Antiquities Scheme Database


2/. UK Detector Finds Database (UKDFD)


3/. Time Lines Coins


4/. The Fitzwilliam Museum Database


The instructions For the Fitzwilliam are as follows, add the following fields as can be seen


Add the following search fields


Early England (600-750)

Early Continental 580-750

Click the “see images” at the bottom of the form

Change the drop down for “Include Coins From” to Both the EMC and SCBI


and then “Submit”


Note if too many hits are returned, you will not see the images, but as you get better you will limit the returned hits by adding content to the “Search any field in the database options”


 

After the porcupine sceatta, the continental runic type (Series D 2c) and the woden-monster type sceattas (Series X) are the most frequent of the continental sceattas. The porcupine sceattas were probably struck the most in the area of the so-called "Mouths of the Rhine", which belongs to the area of the basin of the river Scheldt. According to current opinions, these coins do date from the period between 695 and 740 A.D. It has been argued extensively by the British Em. Professor D.M. Metcalf that most of the porcupine sceattas known as the Series E do originate from the Continent indeed without any doubt. The minting of this most successful of all sceatta coinages got well under way during the long reign of Prime-Minister Redbad (690-719 AD). Along the North Sea coasts these tiny silver coins were by far the most convenient and reliable means of payment, from Northern France to Denmark. From the distribution patterns of the finds of continental sceattas all over North Western Europe, archaeologists and historians can deduct that the size of the economy of the people of the Fresones was bigger than that of any surrounding Merovingian, Anglo-Saxon or Scandinavian kingdom



                                                                                            quote: www.time-lines.co.uk